The biggest food recalls in history

 

Each year, there are hundreds, if not thousands of food recalls around the globe. According to Food Safety Magazine, in 2017 there were 456 food recalls in the United States alone. Though these statistics cover minor and major food recalls, it shows how they happen more than we might think.

So, what are some of history’s biggest food recalls? The experts at House Call Doctor have listed the top four.

  1. Peanut Corporation of America: 2008 – 2009

Between September 2008 and March 2009, the Peanut Corporation of America issued one of the largest food recalls in history, for products which may contain salmonella. A total of 714 infections were reported during this time, along with eight deaths. The outbreak affected 46 States across the United States and the recall involved 2,100 products from more than 200 companies.

  1. Wright County Eggs/Hillandale Farms: 2010

In 2010, Wright County Eggs and Hillandale Farms issued a recall of approximately 550 million eggs following 1,500 reported cases of salmonella poisoning. As the outbreak spread to several States across America, both Wright County Eggs and Hillandale Farms voluntarily expanded their initial recalls of the product.

  1. Menu Food pet food: 2007

During March 2007, pet food processor Menu Foods issued a recall of 60 million cans after the products were found to be contaminated with melamine. This recall affected more than 150 different brands and is said to have led to the deaths of thousands of cats and dogs across America. The recall was only announced following complaints from customers that their pets were ill, lethargic and drinking or urinating more than usual.

  1. Hallmark beef: 2008

In 2008, America saw its largest nationwide meat recall after 143 million pounds of Hallmark beef was taken off shelves. The recall came after the company allowed unhealthy and mistreated cattle to be slaughtered without inspection. The beef was pulled from shelves as it was believed the animals were infected with mad cow disease.